Rindskopf Antique Glass 1

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History of the Josef Rindskopf Company and its Glass

Rise and decline of the Rindskopf Glass factory

 
The development of the northern coal basin attracted numerous heat-dependent industries. Josef Rindskopf built Josefhütte in Kostanay -Tlic in 1891 and produced baroque glass, which was sent to Polevsko for refining.

His four children (Albert, Edwin, Sidney and Sherman), expanded the business by acquiring a glass house in Duchov that they renamed “Fanny”. They also changed their surname from Rindskopf to Riethof. In 1900, they added Barbarahütte in Mstisov. Barbarahütte, with 120 employees, was best known for its iridized glass production during the Art Nouveau period. This class of glass was given names like Granada, Alhambra and Pepita, although its most coveted glass (by collectors) is the Diluvium. Diluvium was made to look like marble giving color to the entire piece. Part of it was left smooth, but most of it was often cut and engraved in high relief.

Like most bohemian companies, Rindskopf experienced severe losses due to World War I. In 1920, it became a public corporation and focused on the production of pressed glass. Despite its best efforts, the firm was finally declared bankrupt in September 1927.